Brumbies name 2013 captain and vice-captains

Steve Lenthall January 10, 2013 9

No GravatarBrumbies coach Jake White has unveiled the captain and vice-captains for the 2013 campaign.

On the back of the 2012 season where the Brumbies surprised many by just falling short of a finals berth, White has stuck with Ben Mowen as captain despite the arrival of David Pocock and said he had not even thought about changing the captain.

White said that Mowen had the respect of the team and was the logical choice to continue in the role in 2013. Mowen was integral in setting up the culture for the new-look Brumbies in 2012 and those plans are slowly coming together.

When asked about this season’s expectations, White was straight to the point in saying he wanted to win the whole competition and believes this side can go all the way.

There have been some changes in the vice-captaincy ranks with Stephen Moore, David Pocock and Christian Lealiifano selected to assist Mowen. Moore is in his second season as vice-captain. Lealiifano and Pocock take over from Dan Palmer and Pat McCabe.

Pocock has previous experience in leading a side at the Western Force and also at Wallabies level when James Horwill was injured so the decision was easy for White to appoint him in the role.

After putting a knee injury behind him, Pocock is relishing the challenge of helping the team not only on the field but off the field and is on track for the first trial match in Darwin.

Christian Lealiifano has been rewarded after an impressive season in 2012 before injury ruined his chances of further honours, and with a number of squad players having Polynesian background White feels his appointment is important as role model and mentor for those players.

Lealiifano, who underwent shoulder and ankle surgery during the off season, was somewhat surprised when White approached him but was happy to be selected in that role and is keen to get back on the field after not playing since May.


The Brumbies take on the Western Force in a trial match in Darwin on 1 February. Another trial against an ACT XV will be played on 8 February in Canberra before the Super season commences at home against the Queensland Reds on 16 February.

Discussion

  • sheekabout

    This is why Jake White is one of the smartest coaches in world rugby.

    It is only right Ben Mowen retains the captaincy. He did a fine job last year & as White said, has the respect of the playing group.

    I’m not a fan of multiple deputies as such, but again the choice of Moore, Pocock & Lealiifano shows White’s wisdom at work again.

    Personally, I prefer one captain, one vice-captain & perhaps a leadership group of another 3-4 players. But you need a defined hierachy.

    • http://www.greenandgoldrugby.com/ Brumby Jack

      Jake said he didn’t want too many in there because it dilutes the point of it but feels the mix is right. 3 forwards – 2 playing at National level – and their best back from last year until injured

    • Blinky Bill of Bellingen NSW

      Happy to see Ben Mowen retain the job, IMO he’s been absolutely terrific.

      I look at what Ben’s done in Canberra (given a chance) and wonder to myself why the Tahs couldn’t see his potential. Now here we are just 12 months later and we’re all scratching our arses trying to figure out who would best in sky blue with the ‘c’ after their name.

      Here’s hoping Cheika gets things sorted out once and for all.

  • brumby runner

    Getting very excited about this upcoming season. Really like Jake’s ambition to win this year’s comp. The leadership group looks spot on to me. Ben Mowen is a very impressive person.

  • Johnny-boy

    No surprise Benn Alexander not in the mix there despite all his experience. I’d love to be a fly on the Brumbies board wall when Jake is telling them how the f… is he meant to develop a winning team with a two legged jellyfish as a prop :)

    • Pedro

      I’m happy to have him around, he was one of the better props for the Wallabies, so I’m sure Jake feels likewise. But seriously, why the hate?

      • Johnny-boy

        Because as a prop he can’t scrummage – period. A cardinal sin in bokland.
        I’m not that big a fan of James Slipper or Ben Daley at the Reds for the same reason. If we are ever going to be a dominant world force, which I think we can be, Australian props need to learn to scrummage first, then everything else after that. I’m just reading thru Topos Art of Scrummaging (xmas pressie) and while it reads like it’s been written by, well, a prop …..it’s pretty obvious we are doing just about everything wrong in the scrum – and Nathan Sharpe would have been one of the worst offenders. It’s fixable so why the hell don’t we fix it ? (rhetorical)

        • http://www.facebook.com/alexander.sharman Alexander Sharman

          Agree totally Johnny boy .. there is a problem at schoolboy and club rugby level .. it really comes from coaching, and it is that scrummaging is forgotten when selecting props.

          Up to under 19 level, you can only push 1.5 metres in the scrum, this means that instead of selecting bookends, coaches prefer to select another flanker as a prop giving more mobility across the field.

          These schoolboy stars then go straight into 1st colts, with the fatboys playing 2nds of 3rds colts. My experience in Sydney was that many of converted Flanker/Props then retire after colts as they dont have the size to play grade rugby.

          So the bigger scrummaging props then think they might have a chance … but then Coaches decide to convert 2nd grade backrowers into ball playing props … and again you have players who are great with the ball .. but rubbish at scrummaging.

          Topo actually coached me a bit … and he knows what he is on about.

        • http://www.facebook.com/alexander.sharman Alexander Sharman

          I guess it also comes from the way the game is played in Australia .. on hard pitches .. with running rugby the focus ..
          I played a bit in England … and over there your job as a prop was simply to scrummage and win lineouts. You were lucky to touch the ball once in a game.
          In contrast in Australia everyone is expected to be able to pass and run, and even if you dominate the scrums in Australia, coaches berate you for “doing nothing” unless you are hitting up the ball every few rucks.

Close