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There Their They're

Discussion in 'Everything Else' started by matty_k, Jul 5, 2011.

  1. matty_k Peter Johnson (47)

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    This is really shitting me right now.

    So many posts with the wrong there/their/they're being used.

    There: They have a rugby ball over there.
    Their: It is their rugby ball.
    They're: They're are playing rugby.

    Sometimes being a teacher is a burden.
  2. yourmatesam Dick Tooth (41)

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    My mum was a teacher and she would have put a red line through the use of the "are".
  3. MrTimms Ken Catchpole (46)

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    Yeah, isn't the apostrophe in They're the contraction from they are, making the are redundant, kind of like They are are playing rugby?
    Henry, Sully, Moses and 3 others like this.
  4. Scarfman Knitter of the Scarf

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    See, this is the problem with grammatical pedantry on the web. You can never live up to your own standards. On the forum I type fast and post the first draft. Sometimes there's errors.

    [Spot the deliberate mistake]
    armatt and RedsHappy like this.
  5. RedsHappy Geoff Shaw (53)

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    No full stop within the bracketed sentence?
  6. Baldric Jim Clark (26)

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    would imply there is. Errors are plural and therefore it should be there are errors.
    armatt and Scarfman like this.
  7. yourmatesam Dick Tooth (41)

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    And there are plenty on the internet!!
  8. cyclopath Phil Waugh (73)

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    I defiantly.,no, definetly., no, definately agree with you're concerns, matty.
    Henry likes this.
  9. matty_k Peter Johnson (47)

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    I read that three times and missed it every time.

    God damn it!
  10. DPK Peter Sullivan (51)

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    I'd like to defend my use of defence as opposed to defense.
    Jnor likes this.
  11. matty_k Peter Johnson (47)

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    My only saving grace is that it is different mistake than the one I was complaining about.
  12. Moses Simon Poidevin (60)

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    Which is correct? I've been using defence of late, however defense feels better.
  13. DPK Peter Sullivan (51)

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    I believe that "defence" is the British English (correct) spelling, and "defense" is the US English spelling.
    Penguin, Mr Doug, Danix and 5 others like this.
  14. The_Brown_Hornet Michael Lynagh (62)

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    I will admit to being an English pedant, but sometimes my fingers are going more quickly than my brain :-/
  15. RedsHappy Geoff Shaw (53)

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    Yes, and much today depends as to what hits the page upon which spellchecker English language version you have selected within your computer's settings.
    DPK likes this.
  16. yourmatesam Dick Tooth (41)

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    So what is Keven Mealamu talking about when he says "We had good 'dee' tonight". Defence or Defense?
  17. DPK Peter Sullivan (51)

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    I'd say he means "defense", because when he says "dee" it's from "dee-fense", which is the way it's pronounced by some, particularly in US English.

    In British English it's pronounced "da-fence"/"duh-fence" (not crash hot on phonetics).
  18. Moses Simon Poidevin (60)

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    Does "de" typically denote an antonym? Ie Deconstruct, deinterlace, decrypt.

    So if you put up a strong wall of defence, it's not really like a fence at all.
  19. DPK Peter Sullivan (51)

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    No, defence comes from the Latin word defendo, meaning:

    1. To drive away;
    2. To defend, guard or protect.
  20. DPK Peter Sullivan (51)

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    Well, technically it comes from "defensum", the supine of defendo.

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