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There Their They're

Discussion in 'Everything Else' started by matty_k, Jul 5, 2011.

  1. Braveheart81 Rocky Elsom (76)

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    If he's an expat living in Hong Kong then quite possibly.
  2. Hugh Jarse Rocky Elsom (76)

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    On the subject of There, Their, They're, La Jarse gets up me for my efficient one word interchangeable pronunciation of "bare", "bear", and "beer" and similarly for "pear", "peer", "pier" and "pair". I guess "ear", "air", and "ere" fall into the same category.
  3. Braveheart81 Rocky Elsom (76)

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    I hope for your sake that when you ask for a bear you get given a beer and not vice versa.
  4. Hugh Jarse Rocky Elsom (76)

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    ^^^ Hee Hee

    Not only did the Bishop say to the Actress that "Timing is important", but he also said "context is everything".
  5. boyo Paul McLean (56)

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  6. Baldric Jim Clark (26)

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  7. Sully John Eales (66)

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  8. strokeside Larry Dwyer (12)

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    Ages of sex,
    20-40yrs old---tri weekly
    40-60yrs old---try weekly
    over 60---------try weakly
  9. boyo Paul McLean (56)

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    Do you use apostrophes properly?
    http://www.smh.com.au/small-business/franchising/do-you-use-apostrophes-properly-20140228-33r0s.html

    ".those without a genuine reason for not using proper punctuation and spelling cannot afford to dismiss its importance."

    "Lax literacy can easily be written off as trivial and harmless, but online studies have shown the devil is in the detail.
    A 2011 analysis of online sales by British entrepreneur Charles Duncombe, from the Just Say Please group, found spelling mistakes can slash revenue by as much as 50 per cent."
    Sully likes this.
  10. boyo Paul McLean (56)

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  11. suckerforred Chilla Wilson (44)

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    I don't know. I did public speaking at school and my coach was a pronouncation nazi.

    The specific/pacific thing really gets me. As does the Austraya/Australia. There is a hews reader that makes we want to reach through the radio every time I hear her...
  12. WorkingClassRugger Mark Ella (57)

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    Clearly wasn't all that strict as the word is pronunciation.:)

    My English teacher at the beginning of every year would perform as she would put it "a literary exorcism". This involved a rather lengthy list of linking words we were never to use either in class or in our writing. That is a grammar Nazi.

    A few things that drive me crazy and it involves newsreaders, is the misuse of 'is' instead of 'are' and 'good' instead of 'well'.
  13. terry j Ron Walden (29)

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    the creeping arrival of poor english that is concerning to me is, well 'concerning to me'.

    what hope do we have when you hear IIRC the bloody prime minister use it as she once did (and was)?

    What, is it of concern to you, or did you mean it was about you in some way, just what the bloody hell did you actually mean?
  14. boyo Paul McLean (56)

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  15. boyo Paul McLean (56)

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    NOW on to Word Crimes, and it’s time to go . Big Brother.
    Honestly, where do we begin with the NBN reality staple that repeats like last night’s massaman curry? Well, let’s start with this series’ first elimination.
    ‘‘You have received the least amount of votes,’’ Big Brother told two hapless housemates.
    No, Big Bruv. They received the fewest votes. Here’s a rhyme to help you remember: it’s not an amount, if they’re things you can count.
    An anonymous reader, meanwhile, picked up a Word Crime in a letter to the Herald(September 17).
    Our reader took exception to a bit that read: ‘‘money spent buying arms and bombs off Uncle Sam’’.
    ‘‘I fully understand that English evolves,’’ she explains.
    ‘‘However, when I was taught grammar, we were taught that ‘off’ in this context meant that the object was growing on the subject. We might pick apples off a tree but we buy something from someone. Does that make sense? Has that rule also gone out the window?’’
    Not on our watch, Anonymous.
    http://www.theherald.com.au/story/2585045/topics-fuel-companies-get-by-on-smell-of-oily-rag/?cs=308

  16. boyo Paul McLean (56)

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  17. Sully John Eales (66)

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  18. boyo Paul McLean (56)

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  19. rugbyskier Ted Thorn (20)

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    One grammatical error that is now appearing frequently in television ads is using 'less' instead of 'fewer'. There is an ad for vitamins that states the benefits of taking it are "less sick days", it's "fewer sick days" you ponytail morons!
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  20. boyo Paul McLean (56)

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