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Training in a hypoxic chamber

Discussion in 'Cycling' started by Braveheart81, Feb 27, 2013.

  1. GPSrow Watty Friend (18)

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    clearly if they used it for rowing, it didnt work.

    they should be breaking records by now?
  2. TheKing Arch Winning (36)

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    I don't know what the big deal is with the culture of semi-professionalism in high schools.

    In the Queensland GPS we don't have anything like this yet, but it wouldn't surprise me if in the next 10 years that they did.

    People that label private schoolboys as soft cocks need to wake up to the fact that the majority of today's wallabies came through the very system you are ripping on.

    Wallaby names are in bold, super players are not. Dare I say you could pick a pretty bloody solid wallaby side from these 'soft cocks'.

    Please note these are only players that graduated after 2000 in Queensland, I haven't included the likes of Jason Little, Tim Horan, Elton Flatley, Tom Lawton, Steve Kefu, Ben Tune or any other established names.

    I can only assume that the Sydney GPS has a similar number of players, Ben Daley is one who plays for the Reds.


    Name
    School
    Professional Team
    Year Graduated
    Quade Cooper
    Anglican Church Grammar School (Churchie)
    Reds
    2006
    David Pocock
    Anglican Church Grammar School (Churchie)
    Brumbies
    2005
    Jake Schatz
    Anglican Church Grammar School (Churchie)
    Reds
    2007
    Aidan Toua
    Anglican Church Grammar School (Churchie)
    Reds
    2007
    Will Genia
    Brisbane Boys College
    Reds
    2005
    James Horwill
    Brisbane Boys College
    Reds
    2002
    Stephen Moore
    Brisbane Grammar School
    Brumbies
    2000
    Mitchell Chapman
    Brisbane Grammar School
    Waratahs
    2001
    Paul Alo-Emile
    Brisbane State High School
    Rebels
    2009
    Chris F'Sautia
    Brisbane State High School
    Reds
    2010
    Peter Hynes
    Brisbane State High School
    Reds
    2000
    Eddie Quirk
    Brisbane State High School
    Reds
    2008
    Matt To'omua
    Brisbane State High School
    Brumbies
    2007
    Ben Lucas
    Gregory Terrace
    Reds
    2005
    Matt Lucas
    Gregory Terrace
    Waratahs
    2009
    James Hanson
    Gregory Terrace
    Reds
    2005
    Digby Ioane
    Gregory Terrace
    Reds
    2003
    Liam Gill
    Gregory Terrace
    Reds
    2009
    Albert Anae
    Ipswich Grammar School
    Reds
    2006
    Rod Davies
    Ipswich Grammar School
    Reds
    2006
    Richard Brown
    Nudgee College
    Force
    2001
    Rocky Elsom
    Nudgee College
    Ex-Brumby/Waratah
    2000
    Hugh McMeniman
    Nudgee College
    Force
    2001
    James O'Connor
    Nudgee College
    Rebels
    2007
    Dom Shipperley
    Nudgee College
    Reds
    2008
    Kimami Sitauti
    Nudgee College
    Rebels
    2009
    Joseph Tomane
    Nudgee College
    Brumbies
    2007
    Jarrad Butler
    The Southport School
    Reds
    2008
    Jonathan Lance
    The Southport School
    Reds
    2007
    Luke Morahan
    The Southport School
    Reds
    2007
    Robert Simmons
    The Southport School
    Reds
    2006
    James Slipper
    The Southport School
    Reds
    2007
    Ben Tapuai
    The Southport School
    Reds
    2007
    Rex Tapuai
    The Southport School
    Force
    2001
  3. Braveheart81 Rocky Elsom (76)

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    A fair number of the people making jokes in this thread about private school boys went to private schools.

    Apparently self-deprecating humour is off the syllabus now too.
    GPSrow, Inside Shoulder and cyclopath like this.
  4. yourmatesam Dick Tooth (41)

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    Pull your head in there tiger. I had the pleasure of attending private school (and had a great time while I was there) with some ex-Wallabies and current and ex-S15 and international players.

    If you have visited these forums more than once I'm sure you too would have realised that there are plenty of private school characters knocking around on the boards at GAGR. Even to the point that I'd bet that the majority of people who post regularly on the forum have attended private school of some description.

    That is the nature of rugby. It is embedded in the "private school, north shore" culture.

    I spent the majority of my school years in the public system and whilst I enjoyed my time at boarding school, I did happen to come across a fair amount of soft cocks while I was there. Kids who had it all but didn't (and still don't) appreciate it. The cost of a hypoxic chamber at the Scots School would have been say $100,000 - my point is that these kids would gain just as much from training in the normal atmosphere as they would in a hypoxic chamber. And imagine what they could do if they trained hard?

    The hypoxic chamber at the Scots school is a classic example of the old boy network gone wild. As [USER=5694]Braveheart81[/USER] said, his Dad is training for a bike ride and because he's an old boy his Dad can use it for free. But rather than put that money into something that the whole school (or even community) can benefit from, the school (and I would nearly bet the old boys network at Scots) chose to put that money into a training aid that will get more use from the old boys than the students.

    My point is that the hypoxic chamber is a waste of money, particularly on some toffy nosed Scots boys (and their Dads) to use as a training aid for rowing (or a bike ride) to gain a minimal advantage. I also think that the sense of entitlement that some up and coming rugby players (and athletes in general) possess can be attributed in part to the installation of such fancy equipment at a school. Get back to basics.

    NSW Waratahs ring a bell?

    I love rugby and will be involved in the game until I die, but this sort of stuff just reeks of too much money, not enough substance.
    I like to watch likes this.
  5. Inside Shoulder Nathan Sharpe (72)

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    Just want to like this bit.
    If you mean by "soft cock" spoilt ungrateful brat - I'm with you all the way.
    i always thought of rowing that it didnt matter much about anything except how much hard work you put in and even with carbon fibre everything i still think that's probably the case.
    Rugby used to be like that.
    Now I think everyone assumes there's a short cut - which is really all a hypoxic chamber is if you boil it down.
    There are no short cuts - if you want to be good at something do it 10,000 times properly.
  6. Rob42 Ron Walden (29)

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    I went to one of these schools, and was certainly no elite sportsman. It was pretty frustrating to watch every year as a gleaming new carbon fibre boat was wheeled out for the glory of the 1st VIII, whilst plenty of other facilities being used by many more boys waited and waited for replacement. It gave you a pretty clear demonstration of the relative priorities of the school, even if it was all Old Boy money buying the new toys. Loved Cyclo's comment above - wouldn't you rather have a High Performance Unit in your maths faculty?
    yourmatesam likes this.
  7. cyclopath Phil Waugh (73)

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    I went to one of these schools, perhaps not at the top of the list for sports-mania, yet loved my sport, as did most of the students, and I got to decent levels in a few. We had plenty of guys who were excellent at many sports, and they got there by hard work. And we competed OK.
    Ultimately, education is supposed to be rounded and encompass academia, arts, music, social sciences and sports, amongst other aspects. None should be the sole focus.
    Semi-professionalism is just wrong at this level, in my opinion. I don't want to get into the whole recruiting minefield, but that does not reflect the quality, rather the morality of the school.
    Sportsmasters crowing at school advertorial nights about elite programs, while the academic results go downhill is just idiotic.
  8. TheKing Arch Winning (36)

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    I get your point, and Youmatesam's point (sorry If I overreacted, I misinterpreted what I perceived as an attack of private school rugby that was simply a generalisation.) but the increasing trend of semi-professionalism in schools doesn't neccessarily correlate with a decrease in academic success.

    At Brisbane Grammar in Queensland, 2012's cohort won the insanely competitive Rugby competition in term 3, and went on to break the states OP record just weeks later with 51 OP Ones

    It's all about moderation. The First XV Hooker Al Harper combined playing Firsts Rugby, rougbly 4 or 5 trainings a week plus the game on saturday with extreme academic success achieving an OP1. The average OP in the team was a 7 or 8 I've been told. (on a 1-25 scale).

    While I can definately agree that this may not happen at Scots, or other schools around Australia, Rugby can be played with a professional attitude and work ethic in combintion with academic prowess.
  9. Inside Shoulder Nathan Sharpe (72)

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    I don't understand anybody to be saying otherwise.
    Isn't the real point that showing any kid a short cut to success, or telling them that there is a short cut to success, is fraught with danger?
    yourmatesam likes this.
  10. TheKing Arch Winning (36)

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    How could you call training in harder conditions a short cut to success? If it makes the work harder, doesn't that mean the boys are training harder?

    Maybe my understanding of Hypoxic Chambers is incomplete, but isn't it essentially simulating going to train in the mountains to increase aerobic capacity, while staying in the school gym? I don't see how that makes it a shortcut fraught with danger. More of a time saving device, allowing boys to handle a professional approach whilst combining it with studies, which could only be seen as a positive to both the viewpoints of rugby first and academics first.
  11. Inside Shoulder Nathan Sharpe (72)

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    Based on results: that's not how its being used.
    I suspect that, at least psychologically, it is assumed that having the thing gives them an advantage.
  12. yourmatesam Dick Tooth (41)

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    Again, back to the original point of what happens when they are in the real world? In the real world, you have to work hard to stay fit, it's nowhere near as easy as it is at boarding school.

    The point is that this stuff is just wrong, schoolboy sport should be schoolboy sport, not semi-professional, it shows that someone somewhere has lost sight of the goal of schoolboy sport. Fun, fitness camaradrie, lessons in life, learning how to win and lose.
  13. I like to watch Simon Poidevin (60)

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    Training for rugby 4 or 5 times a week is not moderation.
    They are Schoolkids FFS.
    Inside Shoulder likes this.
  14. sportfan Frank Row (1)

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    It's interesting to see that the top NRL and AFL teams are training in a simulated altitude rooms. Collingwood, Swans, St Kilda, Rabbitohs, Storm, Bulldogs, Tigers, Titans. They are using it for both athlete conditioning and for the ability to get injured players back full fitness quicker. When will we see professional rugby teams do the same?

    Good on The Scots College for pushing boundaries and becoming the first school with an altitude room. The students will have a great opportunity to use equipment and techniques employed by world class athletes. The lessons in physiology alone would be of great benefit to an aspiring sports scientist.
  15. Inside Shoulder Nathan Sharpe (72)

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    I am sold.
    Where do I get one?
    Of course if they could install it at Thredbo then they'd get double the benefit.
    yourmatesam likes this.
  16. sportfan Frank Row (1)

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    Majority of equipment here and around the world is supplied by an Aussie company called Altitude Training Systems. A few of my cycling mates have purchased the portable systems they produce.
  17. Rob42 Ron Walden (29)

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    Hopefully not until there's some decent evidence that simulated high altitude training for rugby-type athletes is worthwhile. The fact that AFL and NRL teams use them is not the highest recommendation, y'know. No problem with the use of hyperbaric chambers for soft-tissue injuries though - pretty sure that's well established to work.
    Inside Shoulder likes this.
  18. yourmatesam Dick Tooth (41)

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    Gold. One of the best lines on here.
  19. Braveheart81 Rocky Elsom (76)

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    I think high altitude training whether actual or simulated is proven to be effective in any sport.

    It helps raise the red blood cell count allowing more oxygen to be carried through the bloodstream. This will have benefits on performance in all conditions.

    I would say that there are potentially bigger benefits for rugby players because they actually have to play at altitude a couple of times a year so it can help prepare them for the conditions by being more used to exerting themselves in a lower oxygen environment.
  20. Gagger Nick Farr-Jones (63)

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    How much does one of those cost? You'd really have to question priorities at that place
    yourmatesam likes this.

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