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There Their They're

matty_k

Peter Johnson (47)
Staff member
This is really shitting me right now.

So many posts with the wrong there/their/they're being used.

There: They have a rugby ball over there.
Their: It is their rugby ball.
They're: They're are playing rugby.

Sometimes being a teacher is a burden.
 

Scarfman

Knitter of the Scarf
See, this is the problem with grammatical pedantry on the web. You can never live up to your own standards. On the forum I type fast and post the first draft. Sometimes there's errors.

[Spot the deliberate mistake]
 

RedsHappy

Tony Shaw (54)
See, this is the problem with grammatical pedantry on the web. You can never live up to your own standards. On the forum I type fast and post the first draft. Sometimes there's errors.

[Spot the deliberate mistake]

No full stop within the bracketed sentence?
 

cyclopath

Stirling Mortlock (74)
Staff member
I defiantly...,no, definetly..., no, definately agree with you're concerns, matty.
 

matty_k

Peter Johnson (47)
Staff member
My only saving grace is that it is different mistake than the one I was complaining about.
 

RedsHappy

Tony Shaw (54)
I believe that "defence" is the British English (correct) spelling, and "defense" is the US English spelling.

Yes, and much today depends as to what hits the page upon which spellchecker English language version you have selected within your computer's settings.
 
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yourmatesam

Desmond Connor (43)
I believe that "defence" is the British English (correct) spelling, and "defense" is the US English spelling.

So what is Keven Mealamu talking about when he says "We had good 'dee' tonight". Defence or Defense?
 

DPK

Peter Sullivan (51)
So what is Keven Mealamu talking about when he says "We had good 'dee' tonight". Defence or Defense?

I'd say he means "defense", because when he says "dee" it's from "dee-fense", which is the way it's pronounced by some, particularly in US English.

In British English it's pronounced "da-fence"/"duh-fence" (not crash hot on phonetics).
 

Moses

Simon Poidevin (60)
Staff member
Does "de" typically denote an antonym? Ie Deconstruct, deinterlace, decrypt...

So if you put up a strong wall of defence, it's not really like a fence at all...
 

DPK

Peter Sullivan (51)
No, defence comes from the Latin word defendo, meaning:

1. To drive away;
2. To defend, guard or protect.
 
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