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Wallabies v Japan, Oita - 23 October, 3:45pm AEDT

dru

Nick Farr-Jones (63)
its still the same type of prejudicial garbage that was trotted out about Quade and JOC before their recalls.

anyway will leave it alone now. Sounds like he’s in the frame if Hodge doesn’t come good.

Apologies in advance commenting following "leave it alone".

Not sure I agree that it is just the same as Quade, but as someone who supported the reconsideration of Quade I think I get where you are coming from. So being fair, if Rennie takes time out with Kurtley checking out "where his head is at" and decides he has switched into responsible good man; then Kurtley commits to assisting training of the younger guys with basically no expectation of wearing gold again - albeit the door is left open, then misses a number of tests while in the training squad with the youngsters picking up on the Kurtley experience and finally with injuries to others, is brought into the 23. OK I'll give him a go with open mind.
 

Braveheart81

James Horwill (77)
Staff member
All of the behavioural issues with Beale are years ago.

His form was terrible in 2020 Super Rugby before he left Australia but his form in France has been consistently strong. His form in 2019 for the Wallabies was good which ultimately pushed him from being a bench player to a starter. Like a lot of our players he was then pretty lackluster at the RWC.

If Rennie decides he needs another fullback option if Hodge is out I doubt there will be too much to consider in terms of his likely influence in the squad.
 

The_Brown_Hornet

Nick Farr-Jones (63)
Rennie is starting to build enough credits in the bank for me to trust him on selections. I think his sense about an individual's character seems pretty good. If he genuinely thinks KB is a good option for Wallaby squad or team selection then I'm happy to run with it. And this is above all the misgivings I've had with Kurtley's behaviour in the past.
 

Up the Guts

Andrew Slack (58)
Outside of Folau, you can expect it for anyone we put there forever pretty much.

No one has shown themselves to be consistently good under the high ball to the extent that it makes it a poor tactic to put pressure on us.
Folau was so good that there was rarely an aerial contest when he went for the ball, he just shut the opposition out with his leap and timing. I think that was most pleasing thing about Petaia, he didn’t just catch the ball without error, he was dominant in the air and the Japanese never looked in the contest. If Vunivalu can get fit and push for selection and Jordy continues what he did on Saturday we could actually turn the high ball into a weapon.
 

Rugbynutter39

Steve Williams (59)
Folau was so good that there was rarely an aerial contest when he went for the ball, he just shut the opposition out with his leap and timing. I think that was most pleasing thing about Petaia, he didn’t just catch the ball without error, he was dominant in the air and the Japanese never looked in the contest. If Vunivalu can get fit and push for selection and Jordy continues what he did on Saturday we could actually turn the high ball into a weapon.
It actually is quite entertaining seeing players with these aerial skills and more so outs defence in two minds knowing this threat. This is one aspect of Folau I missed which is afl experience honed as well.
 

Drew

Dave Cowper (27)
He’d also take that tactic out of the equation, which meant less mid field bombs/ box kicks, which meant a better game to watch
 
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Jeffrey

Stan Wickham (3)
I just want to make a small comment on the Japanese rugby team.

Among others,
James Moore, Ben Gunther, Jack Cornelsen are Aussies.
Michael Leitch is Kiwi
Pieter Labuschagne, Dylan Riley are Saffas

All of these fellas (perhaps only Gunther) would probably not make their home nation.

So, is it better to be a small fish in a big pond, or a big fish in a small pond? (Let's put aside the false dichotomy that this question purports for now)

Michael Leitch and James Moore and Labuschange particularly by virtue of being in the team for some time now, seem to play out of their skins in the Japanese jersey. Somehow, they grow an arm and a leg. Similarly, all the other Japanese players punch above their weight. Their pack was heavily outsized against the Irish at the World Cup, they had only 1 guy above 1.95m, and yet they consistently compete at a level that defies belief. That red and white jersey seem to mean more to the Japs, natural or naturalised. And the natural tendency of the Japanese to be ultra-prepared, to transfer their natural smarts into tactical advantages, and to seek out competitive advantages to cover for their natural disadvantages, this environment seem to push players not just to potential, but it pushes their potential ceiling as well.

Somehow, I just cannot see Leitch or Moore or Fukuoka, or Horie or Inagaki or Nakamura playing better than they do if they were in the Wallabies, or the ABs, or the Boks. So big fish small pond or small fish big pond? Sometimes, the questions we ask are traps we lay for oursevles, because life is just not so simple.

Sure, Japan is still not yet a tier one country, but they are such a terrific feature to World Rugby, and their steady progress is nothing short of remarkable. They have always been my second favourite team.
 
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kiap

Andrew Slack (58)
I just want to make a small comment on the Japanese rugby team.

Among others,
James Moore, Ben Gunther, Jack Cornelsen are Aussies.
Michael Leitch is Kiwi
Pieter Labuschagne, Dylan Riley are Saffas

All of these fellas (perhaps only Gunther) would probably not make their home nation.

So, is it better to be a small fish in a big pond, or a big fish in a small pond? (Let's put aside the false dichotomy that this question purports for now)

Michael Leitch and James Moore and Labuschange particularly by virtue of being in the team for some now, seem to play out of their skins in the Japanese jersey. Somehow, they grow an arm and a leg. Similarly, all the other Japanese players punch above their weight. Their pack was heavily outsized against the Irish at the World Cup, they had only 1 guy above 1.95m, and yet they consistently compete at a level that defies belief. That red and white jersey seem to mean more to the Japs, natural or naturalised. And the natural tendency of the Japanese to be ultra-prepared, to transfer their natural smarts into tactical advantages, and to seek out competitive advantages to cover for their natural disadvantages, this environment seem to push players not just to potential, but it pushes their potential ceiling as well.

Sure, Japan is still not yet a tier one country, but they are such a terrific feature to World Rugby, and their steady progress is nothing short of remarkable. They have always been my second favourite team.
Good post.

Strictly speaking, Japan are a tier one country, though. All it takes is for WR to declare it, which they've done despite Japan not (yet) being in an all-T1 annual competition.
 

Hawko

Geoff Shaw (53)
Last time I saw Beale playing in France for Racing, he was playing at 13. Looked good, but that was a while ago. Does anyone who watches French Rugby know where positionally he is playing and how he has been going?
 

Dctarget

Steve Williams (59)
Last time I saw Beale playing in France for Racing, he was playing at 13. Looked good, but that was a while ago. Does anyone who watches French Rugby know where positionally he is playing and how he has been going?
Alternates between 15 and 13. Been playing well but in an absolutely stacked backline. Been playing much better than the other alternatives in Paia'aua and Holmes.
 
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