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Wallabies v Wales, Principality Stadium, Sun 27th November, 2.15am AEST

Pfitzy

Jason Little (69)
Lolesio's organisation of the backline has been pretty non-existent. We generally rely on White for that but I think it's the primary reason he's now on the outer. He's had a bunch of chances and I think it has become pretty clear that Rennie invested the time in the wrong person.

And that goes back to how the Brumbies are running their setup. The success of a team doesn't necessarily create successful individuals. Moneyball, in reverse.

Lolesio is a good player, and wouldn't have a contract otherwise, but is he "running the cutter" in the way the Test side needs a flyhalf? With a solid forward pack scoring maul tries in front, and a fairly rocking backline at the Ponies with a superstar 9, he doesn't need to be Steve Larkham.
 

Dctarget

Michael Lynagh (62)
Specifically on Jock - he needs to gain bulk so he's as big as guys like the Italian 15 that got breakthrough player of the year. That guy is a monster the likes of which rugby has never seen.
Well when Jock can run like Capuozzo I will forgive him for being skinny. Until then he can gain some more muscle so he doesn’t get fended off by Penaud again.
 

fatprop

Jason Little (69)
Staff member
And that goes back to how the Brumbies are running their setup. The success of a team doesn't necessarily create successful individuals. Moneyball, in reverse.

Lolesio is a good player, and wouldn't have a contract otherwise, but is he "running the cutter" in the way the Test side needs a flyhalf? With a solid forward pack scoring maul tries in front, and a fairly rocking backline at the Ponies with a superstar 9, he doesn't need to be Steve Larkham.
Darwin suggests that players in these programs are often of less value if when they leave for another club as well
 
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whitefalcon

Alfred Walker (16)
I thought Campbell and Lolesio would both start, but can accept the reasons given for them being passed over.

But here's my tip for the backline at the end of the game:

9 McDermott, 10 Hodge, 11 Gordon, 12 Ikitau, 13 Wright, 14 Nawaqanitawase, 15 Campbell. Donaldson HIA, Petaia Achilles. Noah still on the bench, unused (tinfoil hat).
5real
 

stillmissit

Vay Wilson (31)
WF, well he's 6cm taller than McKenzie but I don't think that will help his cause. I don't think I have seen him play.
 

fatprop

Jason Little (69)
Staff member
He always looks bigger to me but the TV is deceptive beast. I remember going to a refs meeting in Tahs area and 4 of the young academy guys came up, I'm 6' 4" but I looked like a midget compared to them.
Yep, I walk around 183 & 100kgs - the size of many a modern 9
 

stillmissit

Vay Wilson (31)
Not saying he's the same league, but Jordan Jackson-Hope?
WF, 2nd reply. Had a look at him playing U20's and he looked to me like a good prospect. I noticed he is not in the Brumbies squad and at 26 he should be at his best. Could not see him playing anywhere, has he pulled stumps, injured? I am surprised that a 10 who played with Mack Mason he has not gone on.
 

whitefalcon

Alfred Walker (16)
WF, 2nd reply. Had a look at him playing U20's and he looked to me like a good prospect. I noticed he is not in the Brumbies squad and at 26 he should be at his best. Could not see him playing anywhere, has he pulled stumps, injured? I am surprised that a 10 who played with Mack Mason he has not gone on.
I believe he is playing Shute shield.

He got dropped from the brumbies (or left, I cant remember) and took up a contract in japan for a year or two
 

rodha

Charlie Fox (21)
Rennie has confirmed what others have suggested here, that Wright was chosen over Campbell because of his experience and voice. Makes sense, with Petaia and Nawaqanitawase on the wings, it's an incredibly inexperienced back three with Campbell. Also noting that the starting back three are the back three who played 60 minutes together against Ireland. Makes sense to me.
I actually thought Wallabies back 3 against Ireland was their strongest of the year. Modern test rugby is designed for larger backs who dominate collisions & are strong defensively. For this reason, I don't like Campbell in the Wallabies back 3.

Campbell is too small and (alongside Foley, Paisami, etc..) makes the Wallabies backline too unbalanced.

This part of Nick Bishop's article this week back up my sentiments:

With Jordie Petaia coming off the bench in only the fourth minute of the game to replace Hunter Paisami and Andrew Kellaway moving into the centres, it gave the Wallabies a big back three of Mark Nawaqanitawase and Petaia book-ending Tom Wright at full-back:

The combination immediately looked far better balanced than the undersized group of Wright, Kellaway and Jock Campbell which had started the two previous tour matches.

Between them, Wright, Marky Mark (Nawaqanitawase) and Petaia accounted for 14 breaks or tackle busts, six offloads, four break- or try-assists and a whopping 54% of total Wallaby yardage on the carry. They also generated six turnovers on contestable kicks while maintaining a perfect 100% record in their defence of the high ball.

Australia have not had such a commanding figure as Nawaqanitawase in the air since Israel Folau was lost to the team. He has always been imperious off the ground, and his newly-developed ‘big body’ gives him added physical presence in defence:

This is what separates the dominant aerial receiver from the merely adequate: the ability to use strength to take the ball forward after the receipt has been made, or take the ball above head level in Aussie Rules style and then offload to a support player (in this case Will Skelton) in a better position.

The presence of an equally big man alongside him in the backfield pulled the best out of Petaia when he entered the fray. Petaia and Nawaqanitawase combined for four turnovers directly in the air or at the chase-ruck after a catch, and two further Irish errors came with the beating hoof-beats of one of the big men pounding in their ears:

Both Petaia and Nawaqanitawase had the wood on their opposite numbers (Jimmy O’Brien and Mack Hansen respectively) in the air, and there was little Ireland could do about it. In the second example, Marky Mark (Nawaqanitawase) uses his strength to bully Hansen back in the tackle, and the new man-of-Connacht was fortunate not to be penalized for playing the ball twice on the deck.
 
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