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World Rugby Chairman

Quick Hands

David Wilson (68)
Well I just finished listening to Mike Umaga talk about why he thinks Samoa and Fiji voted for Beaumont, he basically said he thinks because Beaumont may have tickled some bellies, and is pretty pissed not with WR, but the fact that the corruption he very strongly hinted at in Island rugby may just continue! He also made an interesting point about why players aren't interested in playing for Island teams, basically because he says they are not receiving moneys that WR is putting into Islands!!

I wouldn't be giving the governing bodies of the islands cash. If I was WR I'd be building things for them at best. A board of expats could run teams based in Australia, pay the players direct and use part of the proceeds to fund infrastructure back home.
 
May as well make it official then. #shadow_kingpin













































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Quick Hands

David Wilson (68)

kiap

Andrew Slack (58)
Well, he wasn't in it for the long haul
Remains to be seen, tbf

Big ole Billy Beaumont, if you recall, lost a presidential ballot to a Frogge from FFR and thence vacated his IRB exco posts, wandering for four years in domestic wilderness.

Pichot remains on board at UAR - and, of course, with Twiggy Sudamerica. ;)

The forty-something Little General might yet get another tilt.
 

Quick Hands

David Wilson (68)
Remains to be seen, tbf

Big ole Billy Beaumont, if you recall, lost a presidential ballot to a Frogge from FFR and thence vacated his IRB exco posts, wandering for four years in domestic wilderness.

Pichot remains on board at UAR - and, of course, with Twiggy Sudamerica. ;)

The forty-something Little General might yet get another tilt.

Well he's certainly an opportunist, so if an opportunity arises for self-advancement I'm sure he'll be there.
 

wamberal

Nick Farr-Jones (63)
I wouldn't be giving the governing bodies of the islands cash. If I was WR I'd be building things for them at best. A board of expats could run teams based in Australia, pay the players direct and use part of the proceeds to fund infrastructure back home.


Having spent time on the ground in Tonga working, I would absolutely agree with that: not because of corruption, but because of poverty. Plus it is absolutely impossible for an outsider to understand exactly what is going on. This is a very deep and impenetrable culture, not amenable to learning lessons from people like us. They do it their way, they will accept help from outside of course but will not accept any kind of directives.

Even selecting a "board of expats" would be fraught with potential pitfalls.


Fiji and Samoa are almost certainly similar in important aspects. It is easy to nominate what sound like sensible solutions, but not easy to work out what will actually be successful.


I would say short-term funding would be a start. Pay on results (or rather, top-up the initial aid or seed money or whatever on results).
 

wamberal

Nick Farr-Jones (63)
similar to working with indigenous communities-work with them,ask them want THEY want;anyway,I digress


When I was still working in Hong Kong and coming up to retirement I saw an ad by the British Red Cross who were looking for a candidate with international aid experience to take up a role as a Country Director. They expressed interest in my resume, and I flew to London for interviews.

I passed the interview process, and they passed my resume on to Geneva for a final vetting (the position was funded by the International body). I did not make the final cut (probably because my actual experience was relatively short-term, plus I was the wrong nationality, so the Brits told me). The Brits did offer me a position as a project manager - they told me that they had been impressed by my philosophy which was exactly in line with yours. "Don't tell them, ask them!"

I was then offered a role in Tonga, which offered some clarity and was close to my eventual home: and decided to take it rather than flying back to the UK and waiting for a project role to come up there.
 
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