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Coal Seam Gas Mining

Discussion in 'Politics' started by Cutter, Aug 17, 2011.

  1. boyo Paul McLean (56)

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  2. Gnostic Mark Ella (57)

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    If nothing else previously posted proves how irresponsible the government has been in allowing CSG to push forward with little or no long term feasibility/impact studies this report on the lack of processes to deal with the salt output illustrates it nicely.

    http://www.smh.com.au/nsw/coal-seam-gas-industry-faces-salt-overload-20131204-2yqx8.html

    I firmly believe that most of the problems the CSG companies will produce will be so long term that they will outlast the shelf companies created by behemoths like BHP, Santos et al and they will all end up as "legacy" issues for the tax payer.

    As I posted earlier have a look at the reports surrounding legacy mining issues in the NSW Hunter region regarding high sulphide coal deposits abandoned by various companies. Now consider the revenue that those mines generated for the state and what the tax payer now has to find to remediate those sites.

    That of course is assuming that a poisoned aquifer or salt laden land can be remediated.
  3. boyo Paul McLean (56)

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  4. boyo Paul McLean (56)

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  5. Gnostic Mark Ella (57)

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    What I don't understand is why with the Gas resources in Australia our government hasn't put in place the same policy seen in the US. That is for our energy security impose a domestic Gas/Fuel/Energy reserve. All domestic supplies are then supplied at a domestic market rate from that reserve.

    We now have a situation where a majority of the gas currently produced in NSW is contracted for export only and not available to the domestic consumer. So we have an artificial domestic shortage, and have to import gas using more energy to transport it.

    In this as in nearly everything they do our politicians and bureaucrats are just incompetent and in some cases corrupt as is now being seen.
  6. Gnostic Mark Ella (57)

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    I like to watch likes this.
  7. boyo Paul McLean (56)

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    Coal seam gas debate has no place for scare campaigns

    Read more: http://www.smh.com.au/comment/coal-seam-gas-debate-has-no-place-for-scare-campaigns-20140224-33cw3.html#ixzz2uIXx8Ev2


    "Peter, there is a gold rush mentality behind the desire by gas companies to create and export the newly discovered gas at locked-in high prices, before there is a severe market correction, and the profits fall.
    There is the potential to contaminate underground water storage areas, and once that happens,, farmers will become dependant upon above ground water supplies, and all their unreliability.
    Put simply, leave the gas in the ground, and let the rest of the world destroy their farming areas, for some short term profits."

    Gold rush mentality - how apt.
    suckerforred and Gnostic like this.
  8. boyo Paul McLean (56)

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  9. boyo Paul McLean (56)

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    The bottom line is "You can't eat gas"

    It seems as though the mining companies want to make their money, then fuck off, and leave others to clean up their mess.

    The mining companies seem to have a goldrush mentality.
  10. boyo Paul McLean (56)

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  11. fatprop David Wilson (68)

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    not exactly turning out babies with two heads now is it
  12. I like to watch Simon Poidevin (60)

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    So that is the threshold?
    There is absolutely nothing remotely funny about this.
    Would love to see your opinion,if your livelihood and your families personal water source was dependant upon one if these "moderately/faintly affected" aquafiers.
    suckerforred, Braveheart81 and Scoey like this.
  13. Ruggo Mark Ella (57)

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    Driest continent on the planet and can hardly afford to compromise any water source. Worrying stuff that most of this CSG activity is happening over the great artseian basin.
    suckerforred, Braveheart81 and boyo like this.
  14. fatprop David Wilson (68)

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    So what do we do, never do anything that may have a down side or some risk?

    It wasn't any chemical used in the process of CSG, just "the leaking pond has mobilised the elements" ie the natural sediment.

    We get all concerned about this and seem to ignore the rest of mining and manufacturing which usually far more concerning like the arsenic used in gold mining and micro particles from coal mining etc etc.
  15. I like to watch Simon Poidevin (60)

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    The difference for me,is that you fly in to the gold fields,and there is nothing around them.they conduct their activities within their boundary.
    If CSG industry has it's way,they will be drilling all over the Hunter Valley and the Liverpool Plains.
    They will be drilling in literally thousands of locations.
    The more times they drill,the more chance of something fucking up IMO.
  16. Ruggo Mark Ella (57)

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    We don't scientifically know enough about ground water recharge hydrology to be screwing with water supply.

    Maybe when we know more we can develop a comprehensive industry best practice standard but until then just leave it alone.
    suckerforred and boyo like this.
  17. Gnostic Mark Ella (57)

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    Go back a page or two on this thread and I commented about legacy issues from high sulphide coal mining in the Hunter. As geology has been a life long hobby of mine I could give you dozens of examples in NSW alone of legacy issues from mining of a wide spectrum of resource types. 90% of people have no idea they are living near an old mine site, because in most (certainly not all) cases the damage and the impacts are isolated due to the very small scale of the old mines.

    The big difference with CSG is the impacts will not be isolated, they cannot be as the mining technique is designed to capture the resource from a large area, that is the whole point of fracking. With the increase in size the increase in risk goes up a lot, as does the problems of remediation.
  18. boyo Paul McLean (56)

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  19. suckerforred Chilla Wilson (44)

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    Just because the punishment doesn't suit the crime doesn't mean that this is a significant issue.
  20. suckerforred Chilla Wilson (44)

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    So how were these elements 'mobilised' from a usually stable state in the environment?

    Yes, they occur naturally but something must have happened to 'mobilise' them and allow them to enter the water supply.

    I would recomend that you go talk to some of the graziers in NW Queensland. Some of them are still fighting to get compensation for comtamination that resulted from poorly built tailings dams that failed in the 2010 & 2011 floods. Oh, and they still can't use the land.

    You might also want to talk to those who have lost underground water supplies up there because mines have 'de-watered' aquifers. You may have, probably not, heard that Cloncurry was close to being evacuated a month or so ago because they were quite literatly out of water. We just don't hear about it because it is not within 2 kms of the CBD of Sydney.

    The effects of CSG are going to be much wider than the effects of local mine because the operations actually cover a wider area once you look under the ground and see what is happening.

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