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Global Rapid Rugby

Strewthcobber

Mark Ella (57)
Did the Hawaii group ever make it off the ground?

Thought the initial announcement was Force, Hong Kong, Singapore, Malaysia, Samoa, Fiji, Japanx2
 

WorkingClassRugger

David Codey (61)
Did the Hawaii group ever make it off the ground?

Thought the initial announcement was Force, Hong Kong, Singapore, Malaysia, Samoa, Fiji, Japanx2


It doesn't appear to have managed to get up. Which honestly isn't the worst thing considering they'd be throwing the entire team together in very short order. All the other teams have at the very least a core to build off assuming the Japanese teams are still on board. Even the Malaysia squad being backed by the Falcons has a core to build off.
 

kiap

Steve Williams (59)
Did the Hawaii group ever make it off the ground?
Some hint of 'no' in the piece below (although also the suggestion of Samoa being keen to woo Richard Fale).

  • Radio NZ: 4:37 pm on 14 December 2018
    Rapid Rugby to provide Pacific boost

    <snip>

    With little more than two months until the proposed launch, Pacific Rugby Players CEO Aayden Clarke admitted there was still a lot of uncertainty.

    UCnjWJk.jpg

    Pacific Rugby Players CEO Aayden Clarke.Pacific Rugby Players CEO Aayden Clarke. Photo: Supplied

    "I know there's a lot of nervousness around Global Rapid Rugby but we've been working with them and also our fellow associations, New Zealand Rugby Players Association and RUPA in Australia around making sure we work alongside Rapid Rugby so that it can happen and it works well," he said.

    "This means possibly we could be talking 30/40/50 extra professional contracts for on-island based Pacific Island players so my job is to work as hard as we can to make that happen.

    "At the moment we've got Fiji included in there and it looks like we're going to have a lot more presence - I know it hasn't been confirmed officially but that's exciting."

    U3fNgdHl.jpg

    14-test Manu Samoa international Patrick Fa'apale is among the on-island based players who could benefit from Global Rapid Rugby. Photo: Photosport

    The Fiji Rugby Union declined to comment on their involvement with Rapid Rugby, saying negotiations were still under way and the competition was very much still in strategic planning.

    It's understood the Samoan bid is working alongside Richard Fale, who was the face of a Hawaii-based consortium wanting to join Super Rugby, and would likely play some of their home matches in Honolulu.

    Samoa Rugby Union CEO Faleomavaega Vincent Fepulea'i said the national body will make an official statement when the details of SRU involvement is formalised with the intended franchise.

    bDiD3hql.png

    A consortium fronted by Richard Fale wants to base a Super Rugby franchise in Hawaii. Photo: Facebook

    Aayden Clarke said one in six players across professional rugby competitions are of Pacific island descent and, despite hopes for a Pacific Island Super Rugby franchise falling flat, the introduction of Rapid Rugby could prove to be a welcome silver lining for the region.

    "Any time that there's more opportunity for players to spread their wings and put their best foot forward and show the world what they can offer - especially the current on-island players and the guys who have yet to secure Super Rugby or European contracts - then that's fantastic," he said.

    <snip>

    https://www.radionz.co.nz/internati...293/sport-rapid-rugby-to-provide-pacific-boos
 

WorkingClassRugger

David Codey (61)
Some hint of 'no' in the piece below (although also the suggestion of Samoa being keen to woo Richard Fale).

  • Radio NZ: 4:37 pm on 14 December 2018
    Rapid Rugby to provide Pacific boost

    <snip>

    With little more than two months until the proposed launch, Pacific Rugby Players CEO Aayden Clarke admitted there was still a lot of uncertainty.

    UCnjWJk.jpg

    Pacific Rugby Players CEO Aayden Clarke.Pacific Rugby Players CEO Aayden Clarke. Photo: Supplied

    "I know there's a lot of nervousness around Global Rapid Rugby but we've been working with them and also our fellow associations, New Zealand Rugby Players Association and RUPA in Australia around making sure we work alongside Rapid Rugby so that it can happen and it works well," he said.

    "This means possibly we could be talking 30/40/50 extra professional contracts for on-island based Pacific Island players so my job is to work as hard as we can to make that happen.

    "At the moment we've got Fiji included in there and it looks like we're going to have a lot more presence - I know it hasn't been confirmed officially but that's exciting."

    U3fNgdHl.jpg

    14-test Manu Samoa international Patrick Fa'apale is among the on-island based players who could benefit from Global Rapid Rugby. Photo: Photosport

    The Fiji Rugby Union declined to comment on their involvement with Rapid Rugby, saying negotiations were still under way and the competition was very much still in strategic planning.

    It's understood the Samoan bid is working alongside Richard Fale, who was the face of a Hawaii-based consortium wanting to join Super Rugby, and would likely play some of their home matches in Honolulu.

    Samoa Rugby Union CEO Faleomavaega Vincent Fepulea'i said the national body will make an official statement when the details of SRU involvement is formalised with the intended franchise.

    bDiD3hql.png

    A consortium fronted by Richard Fale wants to base a Super Rugby franchise in Hawaii. Photo: Facebook

    Aayden Clarke said one in six players across professional rugby competitions are of Pacific island descent and, despite hopes for a Pacific Island Super Rugby franchise falling flat, the introduction of Rapid Rugby could prove to be a welcome silver lining for the region.

    "Any time that there's more opportunity for players to spread their wings and put their best foot forward and show the world what they can offer - especially the current on-island players and the guys who have yet to secure Super Rugby or European contracts - then that's fantastic," he said.

    <snip>

    https://www.radionz.co.nz/internati...293/sport-rapid-rugby-to-provide-pacific-boos

I'd say that's almost a confirmation that Hawaii is a no. I still think Singapore is the likely other drop out but I guess we'll see. If it's just the 6 then that's not too far from the original. We'll have to wait and see how things go.
 

kiap

Steve Williams (59)
I still think Singapore is the likely other drop out but I guess we'll see.
Absence of evidence is not evidence of absence

There is zero … mitsubishi zero … coming out of Japan, which is even less than Singapore.

If it's just the 6 then that's not too far from the original. We'll have to wait and see how things go.

Yes indeed
 

kiap

Steve Williams (59)
There are still unknown unknowns to be revealed.

The following is out of South Africa 5 hours ago:
  • Seven or eight teams in Rapid Rugby
  • February to mid June
  • SA province Valke included - separate from any potential Malaysian side, however they will play away.
  • This is SARU approved (will be a bit like Argentina Pampas who played in SA and, indeed, OZ some years back)
  • Teams from among: Force, HK, Fiji, Valke, Malaysia, Japan, Singapore, Samoa.
Most of the above particulars are from a Monsieur Joubert of Valke (for those who aren't forensic readers, this means he is not Matt Hodgson. In other words he ain't at the source). :)

Nevertheless, this stuff is closer to the source than our own witterings as message board tragics.


via Netwerk24.com (translated from Afrikaans):


Valke in 2019 deel van nuwe internasionale rugbyreeks
By Tinus Van Staden December 16, 2018 09:37 | Rapport​
MA0KvZE.png
Die Valke (the Falcons) will participate in a brand new international rugby competition next year.​
The Falcons will be one of seven or eight teams to participate in the Global Rapid Rugby Tournament, a brainchild of Australian millionaire Andrew Forrest.​
The tournament came about as a competitive event in which Western Force could play after being pushed out of Super Rugby last year.​
In addition to the Force and Falcons, teams from Fiji, Hong Kong, Japan, Malaysia, Samoa and Singapore will also participate in this tournament, which will take place from February to mid June.​
Rudy Joubert, the Falcons director of rugby, says the South African Rugby Union (Saru) has given the necessary approval. World Rugby has also given approval for Global Rapid Rugby so that the Falcons can participate in this tournament.​
Joubert says the Falcons will participate in this tournament and at the SuperSport Challenge.​
According to him, the Falcons participation in this competition will provide a welcome financial injection. Another plus is the experience that the players will gain.​
Rapid Rugby is experimenting with a few bold rules, such as "power tries", which count nine points when the play begins from within opponent's quarter.​
Robbie McRobbie, Hong Kong Rugby CEO, apparently played a major role in the Valke's participation in the tournament.​
McRobbie and Mal Thompson, a former chairman of the Falcons Rugby Company, are well-known friends.​
The matches will be played in all participating countries except South Africa.​
More about: Valke | Global Rapid Rugby Tournament | International Rugby Series | 2019​
 

ForceFan

Chilla Wilson (44)
Matt Hodgson speaking to the BBC Sportshour.

Could Global Rapid Rugby convert Asia into a rugby continent?

In 2017, Western Force was removed from Super Rugby because Australian Rugby Union couldn’t support five teams. The Forces’ owner Andrew Forest annoyed by ARU’s decision created his own league, Global Rapid Rugby. He has made a few changes to the traditional format of rugby union: matches are 70 minutes long, there are restrictions on kicking and it will be broadcast in a 90 min slot on TV. The league has been backed by World Rugby and there are several teams based in Asia like Malaysia, Singapore and Hong Kong. Head of Global Rapid Rugby and former Wallaby Matt Hodgson explains the benefits of the league.

https://www.bbc.co.uk/sounds/play/p06vm33h
 

southsider

Arch Winning (36)
Yep, Ryan Martin. I reckon "a high school coach" underrates him a little..


Not really, that’s exactly what he is, he took 10 weeks off to assist with the Otago NPC team and also coaches a club side but his main coaching experiences come from high schools, he is even coaching his high school team next year after GRR is done....it’s not neccisarily a bad thing but he is for all intensive purposes first and foremost a schools rugby coach
 

kiap

Steve Williams (59)
Otago NPC team and also coaches a club side

See, there ya go.

Attack coach in the Mitre 10, including winning the Ranfurly Shield, local premier side head coach, New Zealand Barbarians Schools head coach.

No mention of Japan

Yep - zero, as mentioned above.

It could be that Japan are not playing Rapid Rugby. Sanzaar are also talking about axing the Sunwolves.

Rugby Japan is in a busy position at the mo' … with just a couple of things on the go …

You don't want to leak or announce anything over the JRFU's head.
 

Rebels3

Jim Lenehan (48)
To be honest i think Japan is the one that will miss out if they do, i don't see the point in them joining from their perspective. I'd say the standard would be slightly below what the Top League is currently offering and calendar wise it just doesn't fit in with their season (minus the obvious empty space they see in the next calendar year).

I don't think the league needs them either, not sure if it's good for the competition to have a team in it that would be treating the competition as their 2nd priority for the year, it just diminishes what it could and should be about.

The Pacific, WA and non-traditional markets should be where this competition is at and arguably what (from what i can gather anyone) the fans are most excited about.
 

kiap

Steve Williams (59)
TBF I think us punters overrate our Nostradamus powers

not sure if it's good for the competition to have a team in it that would be treating the competition as their 2nd priority for the year
It's a 2nd tier comp, bruv.

Even the Rugby Championship is going to be 2nd priority for the year

The Pacific, WA and non-traditional markets should be where this competition is at and arguably what (from what i can gather anyone) the fans are most excited about.
Anyone can voice their opinion on here

And that's great
 

Rebels3

Jim Lenehan (48)
TBF I think us punters overrate our Nostradamus powers


It's a 2nd tier comp, bruv.

Even the Rugby Championship is going to be 2nd priority for the year



Anyone can voice their opinion on here

And that's great

Congratulations you managed to pick out a slight mishap, you must feel very empowered.
 
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