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RC - Wallabies vs Springboks, Gold Coast Sunday 12 September 8:05 PM

dru

Phil Kearns (64)
I wish the example of this law was for someone who contributed to medicine or science in an exemplary way, and not simply rugby.

I understand the audience of this thread, but i hate how athletes are placed on the pedestal and we don't acknowledge those who quietly contribute so much more to society.

I can't think of too many occupations that are as effected by a natural non-inclination to be resident for 4 years. Perhaps medical volunteers to overseas charities? Generally though, in both medicine or science, an expat is going to be thinking about qualifying for a different passport.

Completely understand your thinking all the same.
 

Froggy

Nev Cottrell (35)
Quade's rugby and citizenship are two totally different things, and should never be considered together. The cheap political shot should be recognised as exactly what it is.
Not saying he should or should not be granted citizenship, it should just happen under exactly the same rules as everyone else.
 

Adam84

Mark Ella (57)
Not really an apt comparison is it? Doctors don't save lives because they're representing Australia. They don't slip on the green & gold every time they research some cancer.

We can acknowledge the absurdity of this situation and recognise others at the same time, they're not exclusive.

Why does someone need to be representing Australia in the green and gold to recognised for this?

My point is that this shouldn't be about 'representation' at all, If its exceptional people who are required to travel overseas for the sake of their role, plenty of scientists and medical staff do this for the purpose of research which benefits Australia, including long stints in overseas institutions.
 
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Sword of Justice

Bill Watson (15)
It's not such an embarrassment when realise he had years where he was qualified and could apply for it but simply didn't.
The only reason he is having trouble now is because he has been overseas the last few season.
Do we know this? I thought he said he'd been rejected 4 times which would imply he has been trying for years. If I've missed something I apologise.
 

Derpus

John Eales (66)
More broadly in the Cooper and Genia scenario it amazes me they dont qualify based on residency alone, or at least haven't previously qualified given the amount of time they've lived here. Maybe it has just been a case of timing of when they applied for the citizenship which has brought them unstuck a bit. Had they applied back in 2011 when they'd spent the previous 'x' years in Australia it wouldn't have been an issue.
This - you only need to have PR for a year (and continued residence for four) to apply for citizenship. Getting PR can sometimes be tricky (the partner visa process is long and painful) but i find it hard to believe they didn't have it for a year at some point in their lives, particularly before they started taking up overseas gigs.

It is stupid that they can't get it now - but i also suspect they didn't apply when they were previously eligible (unless they've already refuted this?)
 
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Lorenzo

Arch Winning (36)
Not much has been made of the try that Hooper fluffed.
Winning'll
Quade's rugby and citizenship are two totally different things, and should never be considered together. The cheap political shot should be recognised as exactly what it is.
Not saying he should or should not be granted citizenship, it should just happen under exactly the same rules as everyone else.
The same rules apply to all, they just now include a provision for slotting the match winning penalty 40 out and 15 in.
 

Rugbynutter39

David Codey (61)
I wish the example of this law was for someone who contributed to medicine or science in an exemplary way, and not simply rugby.

I understand the audience of this thread, but i hate how athletes are placed on the pedestal and we don't acknowledge those who quietly contribute so much more to society.
Was having same discussion about others impact by border closures e.g. boarding school kids in other states and comments by others if they were AFL or NRL players they would not have this problem. As long as some consistency I suppose. Granting citizenship for Quade is more a case of also recognising contribution but also international nature of their business which can lead to time away from home.
 

Rugbynutter39

David Codey (61)
I'd only support it if missing a match winning penalty 40 out and 15 in revokes citizenship.

Yep you screw up and lose us a game you get your citizenship revoked...better still maybe we swap out their citizenship and bestow on other some top class rugby player so they can qualify to play for the wallabies....
 

Dismal Pillock

Andrew Slack (58)
Yep you screw up and lose us a game you get your citizenship revoked.
On the spot. We're in the entertainment business, make a spectacle of it. Grim-faced cops waiting on the sideline, deportation papers up on the big screen, pen poised over the dotted line to make it official, little injury golf cart ready to ferry the offender off the field and directly to the airport, crowd screaming abuse, ratings gold.
 

Rugbynutter39

David Codey (61)
On the spot. We're in the entertainment business, make a spectacle of it. Grim-faced cops waiting on the sideline, deportation papers up on the big screen, pen poised over the dotted line to make it official, little injury golf cart ready to ferry the offender off the field and directly to the airport, crowd screaming abuse, ratings gold.
Yep we already have a rule to revoke rights of stay for undesirables - add wallaby rugby underperformers to the list. good way to ship them off....send them off packing to pro competition in Romania perhaps or MLR in the states provided they meet the old fart needing to be pensioned off rule
 

Blue

Andrew Slack (58)
I find the concept of a person representing a country in anything without being a citizen totally bizarre.

Some SAF players in England, Ireland, and France have played test matches and once they retire they have to leave (no visa).

It's bullshit.
 

Bullrush

John Thornett (49)
Well, for the most part, countries really are just made up things we've all just decided to agree are real.
 

Dismal Pillock

Andrew Slack (58)
I find the concept of a person representing a country in anything without being a citizen totally bizarre.

Some SAF players in England, Ireland, and France have played test matches and once they retire they have to leave (no visa).

It's bullshit.
I don't get it at all either. How can you not have a passport for the country you're representing?

Well, for the most part, countries really are just made up things we've all just decided to agree are real.

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Braveheart81

James Horwill (77)
Staff member
I find the concept of a person representing a country in anything without being a citizen totally bizarre.

Some SAF players in England, Ireland, and France have played test matches and once they retire they have to leave (no visa).

It's bullshit.

Citizenship is pretty arbitrary though. Some countries will make someone a citizen overnight so they can compete for them at the Olympics.

Some countries allow dual citizenship (mostly Commonwealth countries), others don't.

It's actually harder and less common for New Zealanders to become citizens of Australia than for many other countries because they don't need to and can stay here forever without a visa. They don't need to become a permanent resident either.

I can certainly see why most sports including rugby don't include citizenship as a qualification criteria because it would create an uneven playing field because the rules are different in different places.
 
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