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SRP (Super Rugby Pacific) 2023 General Chat

Jimmy_Crouch

Ken Catchpole (46)
Ideally you would just like to see a strong application of the law that if someone is down for a minute or longer they have to go off. Along with the other ideas they have put into place this year.
 

Ignoto

John Thornett (49)
I actually watched a bit of Origin last night, and was pretty amused when they put up a graphic showing play had gone almost 5 mins without a "stoppage."
Mine was the "intensity" graphic. That there's a correlation between metres made per X demonstrating a game is more or less intense than another.

Also, the commentary highlighted how spoilt we can be Maloney compared to the league ones of Gould and Gallen.....
 

The Ghost of Raelene

Mark Ella (57)
Mine was the "intensity" graphic. That there's a correlation between metres made per X demonstrating a game is more or less intense than another.

Also, the commentary highlighted how spoilt we can be Maloney compared to the league ones of Gould and Gallen.....
Ch9 is in the toilet when it comes the commentary. Fox League do 10x the job but don’t get rights to simulcast Origin.
 

Dan54

Tim Horan (67)
Just been listening to Eddie Jones on a podcast. He thinks the Aussie teams seem to of lost their individual ways of playing since going to 5 teams as player have moved around. I am wondering on others thoughts on it. As he said Reds were tradionally a set piece with great kicking game team, Tahs were a team of athletes, and Brumbies had the power game.

And note He was not saying in anyway that Aus had too many teams (neither am I), just I found it real interesting that is something that happens, not so much with number of teams etc, but with player movement? Does anyone else think with a lot of player movement teams tend to lose a bit of their usual style?
I thinking in NZ we haven't had a great amount of player movement, and players that get chased tend to be ones that fit into style team already plays, ie my team the Canes have almost always played in a similar open style and have never really been hell of a strong in forwards, and Crusaders have since they started been a powerful forward pack, that loves a turnover at breakdown etc.
 

Adam84

Nick Farr-Jones (63)
Aus Govt main sponsor of the Fijian U20s team on top of the Drua
IMG_0811.jpeg
 

The Ghost of Raelene

Mark Ella (57)
Better than it saying “CCP”


Just been listening to Eddie Jones on a podcast. He thinks the Aussie teams seem to of lost their individual ways of playing since going to 5 teams as player have moved around. I am wondering on others thoughts on it. As he said Reds were tradionally a set piece with great kicking game team, Tahs were a team of athletes, and Brumbies had the power game.

And note He was not saying in anyway that Aus had too many teams (neither am I), just I found it real interesting that is something that happens, not so much with number of teams etc, but with player movement? Does anyone else think with a lot of player movement teams tend to lose a bit of their usual style?
I thinking in NZ we haven't had a great amount of player movement, and players that get chased tend to be ones that fit into style team already plays, ie my team the Canes have almost always played in a similar open style and have never really been hell of a strong in forwards, and Crusaders have since they started been a powerful forward pack, that loves a turnover at breakdown etc.
I hadn’t really thought about that but it does seem pretty right. Brumbies have probably held their style the most. I couldn’t tell you what the Tahs style is right now and that’s the same the same for the Reds. (not ignoring the Rebels & Force, they just don’t feature in that quote)
 

Dan54

Tim Horan (67)
@The Ghost of Raelene , I hadn't thought of it until I heard Eddie mention it. And really is quite accurate. Another reason I find it interesting to listen to these people who are really involved and get a real good rugby brain!


Just out of interest since posting that I have just watched on Sky tv the 2003 rugby final of super 12, what a bloody good game, so much fun to watch. Crusaders had a couple of baby face youngsters, Richie McCaw in 7 jersey and Dan Carter in the 12 jersey. Look like they may grow into reasonable rugby players, that young fella McCaw is just bloody relentless, just non stop. Crusaders also had a number 8 Scott Robertson looks like he know game, maybe a decent coach in future;). Another takeout was how physical the game was, but no whining, just all getting about business, one lineout Ali Wlliams holds down Chris Jack in lineout, so Jack lashes out with elbow (penalty reversed bacuse of it) but I laughed as Greg Somerville (Jacks teammate) seemed to cop most of force of elbow!:D
 

RemainingInTheGame

Peter Burge (5)
Surely Tom Christie must now be very up on the list of greatest players never to make the ABs?

Only 25, so it could be soon, but an amazing season from him this year.
 

Marce

Jim Lenehan (48)
I'd say league is more consistent. Turn on the NRL and you're likely to get a solid 6/10 game whereas rugby has bigger variance with better highs but the dud matches are more frequent and really suck.
I agree. A good game of rugby is better than a good game of League. Sadly you watch more good League games than in Rugby, specially if you compare Super Rugby and NRL. The Aussie derbies at Super Rugby are good but when the Aussies face the Kiwis you know that the Kiwis are gonna smash them
 

The Ghost of Raelene

Mark Ella (57)
I agree. A good game of rugby is better than a good game of League. Sadly you watch more good League games than in Rugby, specially if you compare Super Rugby and NRL. The Aussie derbies at Super Rugby are good but when the Aussies face the Kiwis you know that the Kiwis are gonna smash them
It’s a problem that we get so excited when a good Rugby game happens because it’s so rare.
 

The Ghost of Raelene

Mark Ella (57)
Mick Byrne coaching the Drua again next year?

Pretty sure it’s him sitting in the Melbourne Storm coaches box in the gear. Bit of Professional development I hope.
 

Dan54

Tim Horan (67)
Seems from next year Adidas no longer suppling the jerseys for NZ super teams, going with an Aussie firm Classic. Story goes Adidas not too happy, but I think it's all part of the new idea of marketing etc for Super?
 

Slim 293

Stirling Mortlock (74)
The Brumbies were with Classic from 2014-2018...

They seemingly still provide for a bunch of NRL clubs.
 

Marce

Jim Lenehan (48)
According Rugby Planet, Super Rugby is the fifth best competition in the world and they blame Australia for that:

RANKED: The eight major domestic and continental competitions from around the world

5) Super Rugby Pacific (47/70)

Super Rugby Pacific is the latest instalment from SANZAAR (previously known as SANZAR), a governing body which was set up in 1995 by the South African, New Zealand and Australia rugby unions. They formed Super 12 as franchises from those countries competed against each other. It has had various different guises since then before the departure of the South African sides saw Super Rugby Pacific set up. There are five teams each from New Zealand and Australia, with Pacific Island outfits Fijian Drua and Moana Pasifika completing the competition.

Entertainment: 9
Quality: 9
Format: 4
Competitiveness: 6
Atmosphere: 5
Marketability: 5
History: 9

As a league, it is still incredibly fun to watch with some outstanding skills on show. The top New Zealand outfits in particular remain some of the best teams on the planet, but it is a competition on the decline. The Australians aren’t as competitive as they used to be, while the departure of the South Africans has left a hole.

From the people watching on TV to those who go to the games, they are losing interest and it only really picks up from an interest standpoint when there are big derbies or it gets towards the play-offs. The end of season shake-up is also overkill, with eight of the 12 teams moving into the knockout stages. While the Pacific Islanders have added plenty, they need a bit more for Super Rugby to return to the top table of the sport.

3) Premiership (49/70)

The Premiership is the only fully professional league in England. A round-robin format was set up in 1987, known as National Division One, before it became the Allied Dunbar Premiership in 1997. Various sponsors have come and gone, with Gallagher the latest to tie their name to the competition in 2018. The 2022/23 season started with 13 teams but, following the demise of Worcester Warriors and Wasps, it was reduced to 11, before London Irish were also placed in administration after the campaign had finished

Entertainment: 9
Quality: 7
Format: 5
Competitiveness: 9
Atmosphere: 7
Marketability: 4
History: 8

The product on the field has arguably never been better, with the balance between physicality and dexterity making fascinating watching. As a result, there is also a nice variety in styles between the teams so, all things considered, the Premiership should be thriving. However, it very much isn’t and, due to financial issues, a shocking three teams fell by the wayside in 2022/23.

There are obviously issues at the top, with Premiership Rugby failing to attract sponsors and more financially lucrative TV deals, while clubs themselves are seeing a reduction in attendances. It ends up becoming a vicious circle and impacting everything. At the moment club rugby in England is not fiscally viable and something needs to change if they are to get back on the right path.

3) United Rugby Championship (49/70)

The United Rugby Championship (URC) is a 16-team league which comprises of teams from Ireland, Scotland, Wales, Italy and South Africa. Started as the Celtic League in 2001 with sides from Ireland, Scotland and Wales, it has gone through several changes since then before four South African outfits joined to create the URC.

Entertainment: 8
Quality: 7
Format: 8
Competitiveness: 6
Atmosphere: 7
Marketability: 7
History: 6

The PRO14 was a serviceable league but the Irish teams’ European focus did rather detract from the competition. As a result, it tended to lack intensity and it was very much behind the Premiership and Top 14 in terms of what it brought to the table. However, the introduction of the South African outfits and everything they bring, from their quality to the TV money, has gone some way to changing all that.

Leinster still rather treat it as a second-rate competition, which is disappointing, and their third choice 23 is still too good for most sides in the URC, but they may take it more seriously after their semi-final defeats in 2022 and 2023. As a concept, it is improving and becoming more and more competitive, although the financial issues with the Welsh regions is a worry for the short and medium-term.

There is also concern over the TV deal in the UK following Viaplay’s fiscal problems, which reduces its marketability at the moment and puts it joint-third with the Premiership, but we’ll see how that plays out.

2) European Champions Cup (53/70)

The Champions Cup, previously known as the Heineken Cup when it was governed by European Rugby Cup, is a top tier tournament for clubs based in Europe and South Africa. Established in 1995, teams qualify through their domestic leagues. It initially involves a round-robin phase before going into the knockout stages.

Entertainment: 9
Quality: 9
Format: 2
Competitiveness: 8
Atmosphere: 9
Marketability: 6
History: 10

The best quality of club rugby in the world still takes place in this competition but there is no doubt that the hierarchy have done its best to ruin it. This assessment is based purely on the last few years, so the new format may well change things around, but the alteration the EPCR made following Covid has had a negative impact.

Their decision was initially understandable considering the circumstances of the pandemic but to not change it for the start of the 2022/23 campaign was odd. The governing body did eventually relent and altered it for 2023/24, but still made it unnecessarily complicated. Going back to the pools of four, where the teams play each other home and away, is a tried and trusted method.

1) Top 14 (64/70)

The Top 14 is the top division of the French professional system and, unlike the Premiership and the United Rugby Championship, it involves promotion and relegation. It is the oldest of all the leagues having been established in 1892, but it has unsurprisingly gone through a number of changes. It was called the French Rugby Championship until the start of the Millennium when the league was renamed the Top 16. That became 14 in 2005 and it has been remained that way ever since.

Entertainment: 7
Quality: 9
Format: 9
Competitiveness: 10
Atmosphere: 10
Marketability: 9
History: 10

French rugby keeps going from strength to strength and it has been a brilliant season in the Top 14. As evidenced by the final between La Rochelle and Toulouse, it is the most physical and intense league in the sport. That can sometimes lead it to becoming a little too attritional at times, but it is still often high quality rugby, with some of the best players in the world featuring.

With a large TV deal in place, fans coming out in force to support their respective teams and sponsors flocking to get involved, the Top 14 continues to grow. They also have two fully professional leagues, which means promotion and relegation works well, and the play-off system often brings out the best in the teams.

 

Marce

Jim Lenehan (48)
Seems from next year Adidas no longer suppling the jerseys for NZ super teams, going with an Aussie firm Classic. Story goes Adidas not too happy, but I think it's all part of the new idea of marketing etc for Super?
Woaaah! I can't believe it. Is this only for Super Rugby franchises? Are the ABs still with Adidas?
 

KOB1987

Rod McCall (65)
According Rugby Planet, Super Rugby is the fifth best competition in the world and they blame Australia for that:

RANKED: The eight major domestic and continental competitions from around the world

5) Super Rugby Pacific (47/70)


Super Rugby Pacific is the latest instalment from SANZAAR (previously known as SANZAR), a governing body which was set up in 1995 by the South African, New Zealand and Australia rugby unions. They formed Super 12 as franchises from those countries competed against each other. It has had various different guises since then before the departure of the South African sides saw Super Rugby Pacific set up. There are five teams each from New Zealand and Australia, with Pacific Island outfits Fijian Drua and Moana Pasifika completing the competition.

Entertainment: 9
Quality: 9
Format: 4
Competitiveness: 6
Atmosphere: 5
Marketability: 5
History: 9

As a league, it is still incredibly fun to watch with some outstanding skills on show. The top New Zealand outfits in particular remain some of the best teams on the planet, but it is a competition on the decline. The Australians aren’t as competitive as they used to be, while the departure of the South Africans has left a hole.

From the people watching on TV to those who go to the games, they are losing interest and it only really picks up from an interest standpoint when there are big derbies or it gets towards the play-offs. The end of season shake-up is also overkill, with eight of the 12 teams moving into the knockout stages. While the Pacific Islanders have added plenty, they need a bit more for Super Rugby to return to the top table of the sport.

3) Premiership (49/70)

The Premiership is the only fully professional league in England. A round-robin format was set up in 1987, known as National Division One, before it became the Allied Dunbar Premiership in 1997. Various sponsors have come and gone, with Gallagher the latest to tie their name to the competition in 2018. The 2022/23 season started with 13 teams but, following the demise of Worcester Warriors and Wasps, it was reduced to 11, before London Irish were also placed in administration after the campaign had finished

Entertainment: 9
Quality: 7
Format: 5
Competitiveness: 9
Atmosphere: 7
Marketability: 4
History: 8

The product on the field has arguably never been better, with the balance between physicality and dexterity making fascinating watching. As a result, there is also a nice variety in styles between the teams so, all things considered, the Premiership should be thriving. However, it very much isn’t and, due to financial issues, a shocking three teams fell by the wayside in 2022/23.

There are obviously issues at the top, with Premiership Rugby failing to attract sponsors and more financially lucrative TV deals, while clubs themselves are seeing a reduction in attendances. It ends up becoming a vicious circle and impacting everything. At the moment club rugby in England is not fiscally viable and something needs to change if they are to get back on the right path.

3) United Rugby Championship (49/70)

The United Rugby Championship (URC) is a 16-team league which comprises of teams from Ireland, Scotland, Wales, Italy and South Africa. Started as the Celtic League in 2001 with sides from Ireland, Scotland and Wales, it has gone through several changes since then before four South African outfits joined to create the URC.

Entertainment: 8
Quality: 7
Format: 8
Competitiveness: 6
Atmosphere: 7
Marketability: 7
History: 6

The PRO14 was a serviceable league but the Irish teams’ European focus did rather detract from the competition. As a result, it tended to lack intensity and it was very much behind the Premiership and Top 14 in terms of what it brought to the table. However, the introduction of the South African outfits and everything they bring, from their quality to the TV money, has gone some way to changing all that.

Leinster still rather treat it as a second-rate competition, which is disappointing, and their third choice 23 is still too good for most sides in the URC, but they may take it more seriously after their semi-final defeats in 2022 and 2023. As a concept, it is improving and becoming more and more competitive, although the financial issues with the Welsh regions is a worry for the short and medium-term.

There is also concern over the TV deal in the UK following Viaplay’s fiscal problems, which reduces its marketability at the moment and puts it joint-third with the Premiership, but we’ll see how that plays out.

2) European Champions Cup (53/70)

The Champions Cup, previously known as the Heineken Cup when it was governed by European Rugby Cup, is a top tier tournament for clubs based in Europe and South Africa. Established in 1995, teams qualify through their domestic leagues. It initially involves a round-robin phase before going into the knockout stages.

Entertainment: 9
Quality: 9
Format: 2
Competitiveness: 8
Atmosphere: 9
Marketability: 6
History: 10

The best quality of club rugby in the world still takes place in this competition but there is no doubt that the hierarchy have done its best to ruin it. This assessment is based purely on the last few years, so the new format may well change things around, but the alteration the EPCR made following Covid has had a negative impact.

Their decision was initially understandable considering the circumstances of the pandemic but to not change it for the start of the 2022/23 campaign was odd. The governing body did eventually relent and altered it for 2023/24, but still made it unnecessarily complicated. Going back to the pools of four, where the teams play each other home and away, is a tried and trusted method.

1) Top 14 (64/70)

The Top 14 is the top division of the French professional system and, unlike the Premiership and the United Rugby Championship, it involves promotion and relegation. It is the oldest of all the leagues having been established in 1892, but it has unsurprisingly gone through a number of changes. It was called the French Rugby Championship until the start of the Millennium when the league was renamed the Top 16. That became 14 in 2005 and it has been remained that way ever since.

Entertainment: 7
Quality: 9
Format: 9
Competitiveness: 10
Atmosphere: 10
Marketability: 9
History: 10

French rugby keeps going from strength to strength and it has been a brilliant season in the Top 14. As evidenced by the final between La Rochelle and Toulouse, it is the most physical and intense league in the sport. That can sometimes lead it to becoming a little too attritional at times, but it is still often high quality rugby, with some of the best players in the world featuring.

With a large TV deal in place, fans coming out in force to support their respective teams and sponsors flocking to get involved, the Top 14 continues to grow. They also have two fully professional leagues, which means promotion and relegation works well, and the play-off system often brings out the best in the teams.

As much as you would like them to I don't think they are necessarily 'blaming' Australia for it. Everything in that paragraph, including the first sentence that you conveniently didn't highlight, is factually correct.

"As a league, it is still incredibly fun to watch with some outstanding skills on show. The top New Zealand outfits in particular remain some of the best teams on the planet, but it is a competition on the decline. The Australians aren’t as competitive as they used to be, while the departure of the South Africans has left a hole."
 
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