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School sporting scholarships/recruitment

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We need to keep this in perspective. First and foremost the GPS schools are schools and the education of the boys is the paramount priority. That is actually why the schools offer scholarships - so that deserving boys whose parents do not have the means can still get a GPS education.
 

Bowside

Peter Johnson (47)
We need to keep this in perspective. First and foremost the GPS schools are schools and the education of the boys is the paramount priority. That is actually why the schools offer scholarships - so that deserving boys whose parents do not have the means can still get a GPS education.

Yes but you have to ask yourself if a kid who only attends the school for a couple of years really 'gets a GPS education'. Do you think the first thing on the schools mind when they offer a kid a rugby scholarship is how he is going to in the class room....
 
Scholarships are offered by Headmasters -not by rugby coaches. I would like to think that the calibre of Heamasters at the GPS schools would answer YES to that question.
 

Scarfman

Knitter of the Scarf
B&W - I think it's a bit early to put up the shutters on this issue. I think it deserves an open book discussion. G&GR has a fair bit of influence these days. If we can get a bunch of insiders to discuss what they know, we might be able to make a difference - one way or the other. Either expose the rorts, or prove the worth of equity scholarships.
 

topo

Cyril Towers (30)
OK, here's what I know. I'm a Joeys old boy and a few years ago enrolled my son there. My son was a pretty useful footballer and had played a bit of rep stuff. I was pretty sure that Joeys didn't give scholarships for sport but thought that I would ask anyway. The headmaster and the coach of the first XV informed me that there were scholarships for Music and Mathematics. There were also scholarships for indigenous students but my son didn't qualify as he wasn't indigenous. I was also informed that, as an old boy, if I would struggle to pay the fees, I could apply to the old boys union for assistance from their bursary fund. My son went as a full fee paying student. He turned out to be a pretty useful footballer playing first XV in a premiership team. During my years there as a student and parent I have never come across anything that would suggest other than the above.
 

Scarfman

Knitter of the Scarf
Cheers topo. That's good to hear. To hammer the nail in the coffin, do you want to explain the indigenous scholarship? My understanding is that they are chosen well before they've had a chance to play much high profile footy.
 
Joeys and Riverview are actually the least guilty of giving out scholarships. As others have previously mentioned, there are A LOT of indigenous students who have very little or no sporting ability whatsoever, but you don't hear about any of them as they don't run out at 3:15 on a Saturday afternoon.

The NSW 16s side is now the main target of schools in terms of recruiting quality players. I have it on very good authority that a number of boys have been "approached" at the tournaments over the last few years. Some schools in particular are more aggressive than others...

It is less of a gamble for the schools as the boys have already displayed considerable rugby talent to have been picked at that level. Mysterious that they suddenly change school for Yr 11 and 12 after playing in Australian 16s tournament... Interesting to go and see how many representatives from the various schools are there sniffing around when the tournament is being played.
 
If a boy is identified as having potential in any field and is given a scholarship in Year 7, the school has six years to develop that talent, as well as provide an education and foster school spirit. It's very different to hand out scholarships in Year 11 when the talent is pretty much developed and there is no time to deliver quality education or for them to accumulate the experiences that characterize school spirit. In terms of boys "getting the education they otherwise wouldn't afford", they are not there to bring the HSC mark up. This arrangement should be called a bursary as a scholarship would imply, well, scholarship.
 

Scarfman

Knitter of the Scarf
bwf and downer, I agree, but it would be good to avoid hearsay and put some evidence up. If you have specific examples, put it up here, with only the boy's name needing to be protected.
 

topo

Cyril Towers (30)
If a boy is identified as having potential in any field and is given a scholarship in Year 7, the school has six years to develop that talent, as well as provide an education and foster school spirit. It's very different to hand out scholarships in Year 11 when the talent is pretty much developed and there is no time to deliver quality education or for them to accumulate the experiences that characterize school spirit. In terms of boys "getting the education they otherwise wouldn't afford", they are not there to bring the HSC mark up. This arrangement should be called a bursary as a scholarship would imply, well, scholarship.

Scarfy, the above quote pretty much sums it up re indigenous scholarships (thanks downer). The indigenous recipients are identified by various sources (often a parish priest, especially in the case of the Walgett kids) and start in Yr 7 as Kurtley Beale did. They are looking for someone who will respond to the sum of what the school has to offer and sporting talent is only a very small part of that equation.
 
Theres a school in the Eastern Suburbs who mysteriously got a new midfielder this year - he entered the school in Yr 11.

There is a school in Parramatta that strangely acquired 2 of their current backrow late in their schooling years. Strange that none of these boys went to the respective schools from Yr 7....
 

supporter

Sydney Middleton (9)
Supporter, if you PM me the name I can check this story out with some Joeys insiders.
---------------

I met his uncle at Joeys and I saw him there. My brother in law is one of the coaches at Joeys and the same story he told. I don't know his name.
 

H...

Banned
I'm not sure how much I can say here, but I have it straight from the horse's mouth - a kid I had a class with and who's name everyone here would know - that his parents approached Joeys about a scholarship and they told them that they don't do that. If memory serves, he came to us sometime during year 10.
 

northman91

Frank Nicholson (4)
I think its great that newington have finally broken their drought and won a premiership outright. congratulations to them.
But what makes the GPS (NSW) comp so exciting is the way we play the game. With the 15 blokes on each team being best mates since year 7 and reaching their dream of playing 1st XV footy in year 12. The thing that can ruin the camaraderie between a year group is the use of sporting scholarships.
I'm not sure of the situation at newington and I know some of their islander players have had relatives there but players like apo this year and ben volavola last year have are obvious scholarships holders. I feel bad for the players in the 2nds that have lost their places in the 1sts due to these players.

Its also the same at other schools with Kings (some of their backrow this years), Scots with Dane Aktinson, and many other players. Grammar and shore and then both joeys and riverview (to lesser extents) are the only schools that dont import.
Its what makes their victories so much sweeter. i.e. Grammar beating shore 34-33 in 2008. Shore beating Joeys 31-29 in 2009.
Its these that make it all worthwhile as schools have trusted their own player development.

I strongly believe that Newington would have easily won the comp this year if they didnt have apo. They have a strong core group of players from year 12 and mostly yr 11 I believe that have won the majority of their games throughout their times at school.
Just imagine if Newington had won the comp this year if without giving any scholarships.

This is why the GPS Head of the River is the most exciting sporting event of the year. 8 blokes from each school who have trained their hearts out for the last 8 months in trying to win a 6min race possibly by a tenth of a second.
The most amazing thing is that each school develops these boys from the first time they sit in a boat at the start of term 4 in year 7. The coaches put time and effort into these boys in aiming for glory throughout each age group and in particular for when theyre in the 1st VIII.

None of the above comments are meant to be racist.
Most importantly I still want to congratulate newington on their premiership for this year.
 
I find this thread quite interesting and question if it would exist if one of the big three had won?

I also question how many other sides have 11 palyers in there first that palyed for their school in year 11 as per newington?

Avoiding answering this question just highlights the whole agenda being run!
its tiresome and designed to protect the big three

if you think different name the player in the other teams that started in year 7?
 

barbarian

Phil Kearns (64)
Staff member
I find this thread quite interesting and question if it would exist if one of the big three had won?

I also question how many other sides have 11 palyers in there first that palyed for their school in year 11 as per newington?

Avoiding answering this question just highlights the whole agenda being run!
its tiresome and designed to protect the big three

if you think different name the player in the other teams that started in year 7?

Mate you can hardly claim that people are avoiding answering these questions. There are more answers here than anywhere I have seen.

And the so-called 'big three' have been subject to plenty of scrutiny over the years, so I don't think the claim that this is isolated to Newington has any weight at all.
 

College E

Bob McCowan (2)
(Source: http://www.dailytelegraph.com.au/sport/years-not-weeks-for-new-wallaby/story-e6frexni-1225873198145)

"LAURIE Weeks has learned a thing or two about persistence.

It's a necessity when your path takes you from Marrickville and housing commission flats through to the Wallabies. As a tighthead prop, particularly, it's not a well-trodden route.

"I just realised you have to work harder. That's what you have to do to get ahead," Weeks said yesterday.

Glancing at Weeks' background - St Joseph's College, Sydney University - you might get the idea the 24-year-old's journey has been the cookie-cutter standard of numerous Wallabies before him. You'd be wrong.

Raised in the non-glamorous pockets of Sydney's Inner West, Weeks aspired to be a rugby league star until his teacher and junior coach realised the nuggety centre was built for a different game.

"I grew up in Marrickville and then in Housing Commission over at Lilyfield, running around there with all my mates, who are leaguies," Weeks said.

The deputy principal of Weeks' primary school introduced him to union. With the help of contacts, he helped the youngster get a scholarship to rugby nursery Joeys."



(Source: http://www.rugby.com.au/players/wallabies/2010_squad/weeks,_laurie,139045.html)


“Away from rugby, Weeks has a Diploma of Business to his name and is now working his way through a Bachelor of Business.”

A prop with brains!
 

I like to watch

David Codey (61)
Have heard that New have 4 new kids @ the school this year, who just happen to play in 15a's. Something about gearing up for 2013 for their big anniversary year.
looks to me they are just trying to disguise the fact that they are recruiting.
I don't mind that they, or anyone else do it. it just annoys me that what they say they do & what they actually do are completely different.
 
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